The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has agreed to collaborate with the Korea Office of Civil Aviation (KOCA) in South Korea to develop and operate future advanced air mobility (AAM) aircraft.

The partners have signed a Declaration of Cooperation to work on AAM projects, as well as exchange ideas, information, skills and techniques.

They will also focus on supporting AAM safety oversight such as licensing and airworthiness, as well as project operations.

FAA acting administrator Billy Nolen said: “Collaborating with our international partners on safely integrating these new technologies will create more efficient, sustainable and equitable transportation options.”

The FAA’s tie-up with KOCA follows its partnerships with the UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand in the National Aviation Authorities Network to ‘harmonise’ its certification criteria and integration plans.

In October last year, the FAA partnered with Japan Civil Aviation Bureau (JCAB) to support future AAM aircraft operations and development.

The agencies signed a declaration of cooperation to share ideas, information, skills and techniques, as well as collaborate on AAM projects and challenges of mutual interest.

The AAM space includes air taxis and electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) aircraft, among other aircraft.

The sector has seen growth in recent years, with several firms entering the segment.

Earlier this month, Stellantis said that it will mass produce Archer Aviation’s Midnight eVTOL aircraft under an expanded partnership.

Stellantis will work with Archer to manufacture the Midnight aircraft and help build Archer’s manufacturing facility in Covington, Georgia.

The two companies aim to start producing the eVTOL aircraft next year.

Hyundai Motor’s US arm, Supernal, has also partnered with Microsoft to develop AAM solutions using Microsoft’s cloud computing platform.

Last year, South Korea’s MintAir signed a letter of intent to acquire Jaunt Journey eVTOL aircraft from Jaunt Air Mobility.