Workers at Stansted Airport in London, UK, have called off threats of a strike after receiving a better pay offer.

British trade union UNITE decided to begin a strike after rejecting an August pay hike offer of 7.5% and a one-off payment of £250 ($282).

More than 1,000 of the union’s members are employed at Stansted Airport.

Following Unite’s intervention, Stansted Airport has agreed to an 11% increase over the year to its lowest-paid workers, as well as a 10% annual raise in pay for other grades and an additional £250 one-off payment.

Stansted’s workforce accepted the new offer via a ballot, bringing the pay dispute to an end.

Unite general secretary Sharon Graham said: “This is an excellent result for Unite’s members at Stansted Airport. 

“By standing together, they forced the employer to return to the negotiating table and make an improved offer.

“Unite is now entirely focused on promoting the jobs, pay and conditions of its members and this ballot result demonstrates that this approach is delivering positive results in the workplace.”

The union noted that workers who had threatened to strike included firefighters, security officers, cleaners and passenger ambassadors, whose strike action could have caused ‘serious disruption’ to the airport.

The 10% increase for other grade workers includes 8% from 1 April this year, plus 2% from 1 October.

Unite regional co-ordinating officer Mark Robinson said: “We are pleased that our strong mandate for strike action made the company improve its offer, which has now been accepted by the overwhelming majority of our members.”

In August this year, Stansted Airport secured planning permission from then-Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Secretary Greg Clark to build a solar farm.

The solar asset is intended to help the airport meet its existing and increasing electricity needs.