Priority Pass survey shows emergence of a new group of travellers

22 October 2014 (Last Updated October 22nd, 2014 18:30)

Independent global lounge access programme provider Priority Pass has released the results of a survey that show the emergence of a new group of frequent flyers, known as 'conspicuous consumers'.

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Independent global lounge access programme provider Priority Pass has released the results of a survey that show the emergence of a new group of frequent flyers, known as 'conspicuous consumers'.

The company interviewed a group of 1,500 people and found that a new group of travellers between the ages of 26-35 are demonstrating distinctive travel and spending habits.

The survey found that passengers in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region were easily annoyed by rude staff, children and poor food choices. However, passengers in the UK get aggravated by long queues and overcrowding.

The survey also found that more than 40% of MENA residents preferred the use of metered taxi to and from the airports and roughly 70.4% and 60% stayed at five-star hotels on business and leisure trips, respectively.

Today's millennial group of travellers speaks an average of four languages and is well-travelled, making an average of 24 round trips and nine business class flights a year. Lack of Wi-Fi access was the biggest cause of aggravation for the group.

While passengers in Europe and North America gave importance to value when travelling, travellers in emerging countries prefer to spend more on a luxury experience.

"Our research provides a snapshot into the insights of some of the most discerning global consumers."

While 70% customers from the Middle East preferred to stay in five-star accommodation, more than half of the respondents from Latin America prefer to travel first-class. Also, 93% of respondents from Africa are willing to spend more on stay in a pleasant location.

Priory Pass global marketing director Stephen Simpson said: "Our research provides a snapshot into the insights of some of the most discerning global consumers.

"The results presented some surprising findings from the 26-35 demographic, who are choosing to splash out on higher end accommodation and other 'luxuries' usually expected in the older demographic.

"This age group, perhaps pre-family, wants to show it is making it and, for them, the airport lounge is a central part of the travelling experience. Organisations looking to engage with these hard-to-reach high end audiences should consider putting the lounge at the centre of their marketing initiatives."


Image: The survey has found the emergence of a new group of young travellers. Photo: courtesy of Ambro at freedigitalphotos.net.