Lockheed to upgrade SkyLine air traffic management system at KACC

31 March 2014 (Last Updated March 31st, 2014 18:30)

Lockheed Martin has been contracted to implement an upgraded version of its SkyLine air traffic management system at the Korea Area Control Center (KACC) in Incheon, Korea.

Incheon

Lockheed Martin has been contracted to implement an upgraded version of its SkyLine air traffic management system at the Korea Area Control Center (KACC) in Incheon, Korea.

Operational since 17 October 2001 at Incheon International Airport (ICN), KACC oversees the aircraft movements within the Korea Flight Information Region.

The company, which won the contract following competitive procurement, will complete the installation of the new air traffic management system in collaboration with main contractor LG CNS.

The new modernised system will replace a previous version of SkyLine, which has been used in Korea since 2001.

"Additionally, Lockheed will offer training support to LG CNS and Korean Air Traffic Center engineering staff at the company's air traffic management system development facility in Rockville, Maryland, US."

In order to facilitate technology transfer and provide in-country software customisation to the Korean customer, both Lockheed and LG CNS have agreed to set up a SkyLine R&D centre at an LG CNS facility in Seoul, Korea.

Additionally, Lockheed will offer training support to LG CNS and Korean Air Traffic Center engineering staff at the company's air traffic management system development facility in Rockville, Maryland, US.

Lockheed Martin information systems and global solutions business' transportation solutions vice-president Paul Engola said: "Upgrading SkyLine in Korea offers a new model for technology transfer to our international partners and continues the system's expansion in the Asia-Pacific region.

"This win affirms SkyLine's capabilities as a safe, proven and flexible global air traffic management system."

According to an estimate, more than 60% of the world's air traffic is managed by Lockheed's air traffic management software and nearly 700 million passengers and three million aircraft movements depend on its airport management software annually.


Image: Aerial view of Incheon International Airport in Jung-gu, Incheon, South Korea. Photo: courtesy of Siqbal.