IATA temporarily halts launch of Cabin OK initiative

18 June 2015 (Last Updated June 18th, 2015 18:30)

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has temporarily stopped the launch of its Cabin OK initiative in wake of the concerns expressed by the airlines in North America.

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The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has temporarily stopped the launch of its Cabin OK initiative in wake of the concerns expressed by the airlines in North America.

To address concerns, the organisation will now produce a comprehensive reassessment comprising further engagement with programme participants, the IATA membership, and key stakeholders.

Launched on 9 June, Cabin OK initiative aimed at reducing the size of the carry-on bags to accommodate more such luggage in the aircraft.

"While many welcomed the Cabin OK initiative, significant concerns were expressed in North America."

The guidelines had suggested a bag size of 55 x 35 x 20 cm (or 21.5 x 13.5 x 7.5 inches) that was 21% smaller than the current size allowed by airlines including American Airlines, Delta Air Lines and United Airlines.

IATA said that while the new guidelines had drawn a lot of interest, it had also led to certain confusions, particularly in North America.

Clarifying on some of the doubts raised, IATA reiterated in a statement that the initiative was only a guideline for optimally sized cabin bags and not an industry standard.

As the initiative is voluntary, travelers will not need to buy new carry-on bags just to comply with the guidelines.

IATA airport, passenger, cargo and security senior vice president Tom Windmuller said: "While many welcomed the Cabin OK initiative, significant concerns were expressed in North America.

"Cabin OK is a voluntary programme for airlines and for consumers.

"Today we are pausing the rollout and launching a comprehensive reassessment of the Cabin OK programme with plans to further engage programme participants, the rest of our members, and other key stakeholders."


Image: IATA said that the initiative was voluntary and passengers did not need to buy new bags to comply with the guidelines. Photo: courtesy of International Air Transport Association.