BAM to rehabilitate Tanzania’s Kilimanjaro Airport

15 March 2015 (Last Updated March 15th, 2015 18:30)

Netherlands-based BAM has secured a €37m design-and-construct contract for the enhancement of Tanzania's Kilimanjaro International Airport (KIA).

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Netherlands-based BAM has secured a €37m design-and-construct contract for the enhancement of Tanzania's Kilimanjaro International Airport (KIA).

KIA is located between Moshi and Arusha and has been handling an average of 900,000 passengers annually that is expected to reach 1.2 million travellers by the end of this year.

As a part of the expansion project, the airport will see the modernisation of its terminal building that was built in 1971, construction of a new parallel taxiway and the extension of its existing apron and taxiways, which would also include runway repair and works on the drainage and sewage.

BAM will also install new airfield ground lighting and floodlights along the apron.

"The agreement for the refurbishment of the airport was signed between the Kilimanjaro Airports Development Company (KADCO) and BAM."

The project is expected to be completed by July 2016.

While part of the fund for the expansion was granted by the Dutch fund ORIO, the remaining was secured through commercial financing arranged by the Tanzanian Government.

BAM previously completed two rehabilitation projects for the Julius Nyerere International Airport in Dar es Salaam, which is the largest airport in Tanzania. The firm is currently constructing KIA's new Terminal 3.

The agreement for the refurbishment of the airport was signed between the Kilimanjaro Airports Development Company (KADCO) and BAM.

Starting operations in 1972, the airport had been designed to handle around 200,000 passengers. However, it currently handles close to a million passengers.

The government of the Netherlands is helping with the airport's expansion by sponsoring the €37m required for the terminal's rehabilitation, reports Daily News.


Image: BAM will modernise KIA's existing terminal building, build a new parallel taxiway and extend its existing apron and taxiways. Photo: courtesy of BAM.