Hong Kong Airport cancels more than 200 flights amid protests

5 August 2019 (Last Updated August 5th, 2019 13:55)

More than 200 flights were cancelled at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) on 5 August after mass demonstrations and strikes severely impacted transportation services.

Hong Kong Airport cancels more than 200 flights amid protests
More than 200 flights were cancelled at Hong Kong International Airport. Credit: Ken’ichi.

More than 200 flights were cancelled at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) on 5 August after mass demonstrations and strikes severely impacted transportation services.

Cathay Pacific, the largest passenger carrier in Hong Kong, cancelled more than 150 flights and requested flyers suspend their journey until it is essential to travel.

From its hub at Hong Kong International Airport, Cathay Pacific serves approximately 34 million passengers per annum to nearly 200 cities across the globe.

Hong Kong Airlines said it had cancelled 32 flights, while United Airlines (UAL) said its flights were unaffected.

Citing information from the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions, CNN reported that more than 2,300 aviation workers, including 1,200 Cathay cabin crew and pilots, participated in the strike.

An internal Cathay Pacific memo seen by CNN suggests that Hong Kong air space and runway capacity at the airport has been reduced by 50% for all airlines.

A statement of HKIA was quoted by AFP as saying: “The Airport Authority advises passengers to check with their airlines for the latest flight information, and to proceed to the airport only when their seats and flight time have been confirmed.”

Aviation authorities have warned passengers about potential disruptions and urged passengers to check HKIA’s website and with their respective airlines for the latest updates on flights.

To deal with the situation and collaborate among business partners at the airport, HKIA has already deployed the airport emergency centre.

The government has also suspended the airport’s express train service temporarily.

Hong Kong has been in the grip of a political crisis over the past two months, with mass street protests taking place in opposition to a planned extradition bill.