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Earlier this year, Sydney and Heathrow independently reported the huge financial benefits to be reaped from offering direct routes into China. As airports worldwide aim to attract increased Chinese tourism, we investigate exactly how and why the country is such a profitable destination for airports at the moment.

We also take a look at the new technologies promising to relieve gate anxiety, locate the world’s most environmentally friendly airports and find out what elements of their design help them to offset carbon emissions, and consider how Auckland Airport’s new traffic measurement project is helping to improve passenger flow.

Finally, we learn more about the See Say app, which empowers passengers to quickly and safely alert authorities if they witness an emergency or terror incident, and talk to brand consultancy Start Design about how airports can develop a unique brand that enhances the passenger experience.

In this issue

Cashing in: how Chinese routes have become a goldmine for airports
Earlier this year, Sydney and Heathrow airports reported huge financial benefits from offering direct routes into China. But how exactly do direct flights into China translate into profit? Eva Grey reports.
Read the article here.

Gate anxiety: the hot topic for 2018
New technologies are set to break down barriers at airports, eliminating the anxiety many feel on their journey to the departure gate. From information apps to interactive maps, Joe Baker takes a look at the tech promising to help.
Read the article here.

Mapping the world’s most environmentally friendly airports
Airports are going green in response to increasing pressure regarding the industry’s environmental impact. Joe Baker locates the world’s most environmentally friendly airports and finds out how they offset carbon emissions.
Read the article here.

Auckland International’s push to reduce city-to-gate congestion
Last year, Auckland International Airport partnered with the New Zealand Traffic Agency for a world first road traffic measurement project. Joe Baker takes a closer look at the solution, which measures real-time traffic flow between the city centre and the airport.
Read the article here.

Airport security: left of boom
US start-up Elerts has devised an app that empowers passengers to quickly alert authorities if they witness an emergency or terror incident. Jerome Greer Chandler finds out how the See Say app can be adapted for airports from creator Ed English.
Read the article here.

Branding an airport: identity is more than the sum of all parts
Start Design has worked with many airports to develop a unique brand that enhances the passenger experience. But how do you go about giving an airport its own identity? Frances Marcellin finds out.
Read the article here.

Next issue

Since the 1990s, friction between Taiwan and China has placed a damper on international airline routes to the country. However, increased tourism and trade opportunities are now causing a sea change, with foreign airlines set to resume services to Taiwan’s Taipei Taoyuan airport. We delve deeper into the issue.

We also find out whether artificial intelligence could signal the end of lost baggage, examine whether India’s aviation industry can respond fast enough to meet rising demand, and profile Munich Airport’s LabCampus, an interdisciplinary idea and innovation centre on the airport grounds.

Finally, we look at how the confined spaces of airports can act as testbeds for autonomous vehicles, and talk to Unisys Corporation about its new solution that uses IoT technologies to allow pet owners to monitor their pets while in transit.