Western Sydney Airport selects Aurecon for engineering design services

29 November 2019 (Last Updated November 29th, 2019 13:30)

Western Sydney International (Nancy-Bird Walton) Airport in Australia has selected Aurecon to provide terminal precinct engineering design services.

Western Sydney Airport selects Aurecon for engineering design services
Western Sydney Airport’s terminal will feature multiple gates and two runways. Credit: COX Architecture.

Western Sydney International (Nancy-Bird Walton) Airport in Australia has selected Aurecon to provide terminal precinct engineering design services.

The work includes developing reference designs and technical advisory support for the terminal building, the aircraft apron, public car parks and roads.

Aurecon’s internal innovation team uses Design to Innovate processes to develop solutions and will be headed by Brett Reiss.

Reiss stated: “We are not just engineers; we are approaching this project with a user-centred design approach to ensure that the project provides a great passenger experience.”

Aurecon stated that its i40 team was ‘instrumental in the development of this approach’.

In addition, Lendlease and CPB Contractors chose a joint venture of Aurecon and Arcadis for the airport’s earthworks and airfields design.

This August, the airport started its search for a contractor to build its new terminal precinct.

Construction work at the airport commenced in September last year, while major earthwork will begin next year.

Aurecon Aviation global head Stephen Symons stated: “We are not just designing a terminal; we are looking at containing space within a built form environment that can be used in the future but optimising the opportunities from this.”

Cox Architecture and Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) will design the airport’s terminal building.

The airport will span over 1,780ha and feature a modern terminal with multiple gates and two runways.

The A$5.3bn airport will be built in four stages. When opened in 2026, it will be equipped to handle up to ten million passengers a year.