Airbus Defence and Space uses its new ASR-NG to improve ATC system

10 March 2016 (Last Updated March 10th, 2016 18:30)

Airbus Defence and Space's newly developed Airport Surveillance Radar - Next Generation (ASR-NG) system has shown signs of unique detection potentialities for air traffic control (ATC) radars.

radar

Airbus Defence and Space's newly developed Airport Surveillance Radar - Next Generation (ASR-NG) system has shown signs of unique detection potentialities for air traffic control (ATC) radars.

The company has carried out several flight tests and calibration measurements to analyse the system's detection capabilities.

Airbus Defence and Space Electronics and Border Security (EBS) head Thomas Muller said: "Our new ASR-NG has provided proof of its excellent performance."

The latest system can enhance the efficiency and safety of ATC under challenging conditions, such as heavy air traffic flow or hindrances caused by wind energy plants.

In a flight campaign at the EBS test facilities in Germany, the ASR-NG system revealed that it can detect small objects, such as Learjet, at distances of nearly 220km and up to a maximum flight altitude of 45,000ft.

The ASR-NG functions as a primary radar system, and in conjunction with the secondary Monopulse Secondary Surveillance Radar (MSSR) 2000 I system.

The secondary MSSR 2000 I has already been installed in the ATC system of the German Armed Forces.

"Our new ASR-NG has provided proof of its excellent performance."

Airbus DS Electronics and Border Security supplies ATC and identification systems for military and civilian organisations worldwide.

The German Armed Forces have deployed the Airport Surveillance Radar, S-Band (ASR-S) at their airports.

The secondary radar, MSSR 2000I, is used by the naval forces of France, Norway, Germany and Finland to identify ships.

The new systems are also used by several civil and military ATC systems in the US, the UK, Germany, France, Philippines and Bulgaria.


Image: The ASR-NG system can best detect small objects such as Learjet. Photo: courtesy of Airbus Defence and Space.