Airport Industry Review is back for another issue packed with industry news and analysis. In the 50th edition, we ask whether passenger profiling is still a viable security measure in an increasingly digital age, explore how the growth of populist movements across the world is impacting aviation, and explore various initiatives airports have introduced to help disabled people in 2019.

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In this issue

Populism in action: are protectionist policies affecting air travel?

Key figures in aviation have raised concerns over the impact that a global rise in populist governments and protectionist policies is having on air travel. To what extent are they affecting the industry, and is the situation as bad as they say? Adele Berti finds out more.

Read the article here.

How is duty-free retail set to evolve in the future?

The concept of airport duty-free has expanded from a small luxury shop in Ireland to one of the highest-earning sectors of the retail industry. Adele Berti asks: how did duty-free shopping at airports reach this height, and what does its future hold?

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Unveiling the biggest airport retail trends for 2020

From launching pop-up stores to using technologies like VR and AR, airport hubs are continually upgrading their space to improve their retail ecosystem. Varsha Saraogi asks three experts which trends are expected to dominate the travel retail sector in 2020.

Read our expert roundtable here.

Point of controversy: does passenger profiling at airports work?

Seen by critics as an exercise in discrimination, and by proponents as a vital security measure, passenger profiling at airports has long been contentious. However, for aviation security experts it remains the best line of defence against terrorists, as Ross Davies reports.

Read the article here.

Using AV tech to enhance airports

Several airports are using audiovisual (AV) technologies to convert a humdrum wait in departures into an exciting and potentially profitable diversion. From virtual reality simulators at Vienna to elaborate LED displays at Charlotte Douglas, AVIXA chief marketing officer Dan Goldstein highlights how AV technologies are giving passengers a travel experience to remember.

Read the article here.

Air Passenger Duty post Brexit: in or out?

Several MPs recently urged the UK Government to cut or abolish Air Passenger Duty (APD) post-Brexit. They argue that the UK’s APD rate is higher than any other EU country and that these taxes add unreasonable amounts to the cost of every ticket. Furthermore, they believe that reducing APD by 50% would encourage two-thirds of airlines to pick up new routes. Alex Love asks: are they right?

Read the article here.

Six airport initiatives launched for disabled passengers in 2019

Airports are becoming increasingly accommodating towards passengers with disabilities, often with the help of technology. From virtual reality to automation, Varsha Saraogi lists the initiatives that airports implemented in 2019 to help make air travel an easier experience for disabled passengers.

Read the article here.

Airport anxiety: a look at passenger stress points

A recent survey of British air travellers identified baggage collection and transfers as the biggest sources of stress for passengers. Adele Berti takes a deeper look at most stressful aspects of air travel and how airports are working to make them less painful.

Read the article here.

Next issue

Could ‘powerfuels’ be the key to reducing greenhouse gas emissions in aviation? Next issue, we find out whether a blending strategy put forward by Global Alliance Powerfuels could help power a greener future.

We explore IATA’s One ID project, which aims to achieve a truly paperless travel experience for passengers, and analyse the potential impact of supersonic aircraft on airport operations in the future.

We also take a look at the current status of home baggage collection services, after the UK’s Manchester Airport entered a new collaboration with travel tech startup Airportr, and explore the reasons why US airports are continuing to do poorly on passenger satisfaction surveys relative to other airports around the world.

Finally, as the clock ticks over into a new year of innovation at airports, we take a closer look at start-ups to watch in 2020.