Saab deploys ADS-B system for Naviair

20 May 2014 (Last Updated May 20th, 2014 18:30)

Swedish aerospace company Saab has successfully deployed its automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) system for Naviair, the air navigation service provider for Denmark.

Swedish aerospace company Saab has successfully deployed its automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) system for Naviair, the air navigation service provider for Denmark.

The ADS-B system will offer surveillance of ADS-B-equipped en route flights over the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Approximately 70% of flights currently operating in this area are equipped with ADS-B-out avionics. Naviair expects to place the ADS-B system into full operation during the fourth quarter of 2014.

According to the company, the system provides ADS-B data to the Reykjavik Control Area Centre, where controllers will use the high update rate surveillance picture to reduce the separation between ADS-B equipped aircraft.

"The system will enable controllers to have greater coverage, which will help surveillance of search and rescue operations, as well as en route flights."

Naviair project manager Henrik Jensen said: "Saab was able to deploy the system rapidly and have it quickly operating to our performance requirements.

"The system will enable controllers to have greater coverage, which will help surveillance of search and rescue operations, as well as en route flights."

Saab's ADS-B solution is claimed to provide safety-certifiable surveillance of equipped aircraft, using its ED-129-compliant sensors that feed data to air traffic management systems in standard ASTERIX messages.

The ADS-B system is said to offer long-range surveillance while using low bandwidth communications links for a cost-effective, high-performance solution.

Additionally, Saab ground stations have flexible installation requirements and support multilateration with a simple software upgrade.

Saab ATM general manager Ken Kaminski said: "The Saab ADS-B system for Naviair, operating in one of the harshest environments in Greenland, is providing reliable surveillance of flights."

"As a result, flights across this busy region will be operating in a more safe and efficient manner."