Mumbai airport starts penalising Covid-19 protocol violators

5 April 2021 (Last Updated April 5th, 2021 15:08)

The Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj International Airport (CSMIA) in Mumbai, India, has started penalising Covid-19 safety protocol violators as the country battles to contain the second wave of coronavirus.

Mumbai airport starts penalising Covid-19 protocol violators
Mumbai airport has started imposing a fine of Rs1,000 for Covid-19 safety protocol violations. Credit: Juraj Varga from Pixabay.

The Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj International Airport (CSMIA) in Mumbai, India, has started penalising Covid-19 safety protocol violators as the country battles to contain the second wave of coronavirus.

The move follows a directive issued by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) that called for stricter action against violators at airports.

According to a CSMIA statement, a Rs1,000 ($13.64) fine will be imposed on those individuals who will refuse to wear face masks or violate social distancing norms. Further non-compliance will invite stricter action.

The decision became effective on 1 April.

“As part of its SOP for the resumption of domestic flights in May 2020, CSMIA had placed relevant messages and guidelines on safety practices across the airport in the form of physical and digital boards.

“Besides this, regular announcements are made through the airport PA system as well as by on-ground marshals encouraging passengers to follow safety precautions during their journey through the airport.

“With the latest directive from the DGCA, these marshals will now levy fines on any individuals who refuse to comply with requests to follow safety protocols established in the wake of the pandemic,” the CSMIA statement said.

Notably, India has registered a steep increase in daily coronavirus cases since the middle of last month. The state of Maharashtra, where Mumbai airport is located, is particularly affected by the second wave.

As of 5 April 2021, India has reported more than 12 million confirmed cases and around 165,000 deaths.