Jordan defers resumption of international flights due to Covid-19

5 August 2020 (Last Updated August 21st, 2020 11:55)

Jordan has delayed the resumption of international flights that were scheduled to commence from 5 August due to the Covid-19 pandemic

Jordan defers resumption of international flights due to Covid-19
Queen Alia Airport is the main and largest airport in Jordan and is located 30km away from the capital, Amman. Credit: T1259.

Jordan has delayed the resumption of international flights that were scheduled to commence from 5 August due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The international passenger services have been suspended for around five months.

Last month, Civil Aviation Commission chief Haitham Misto announced that Queen Alia International Airport in Amman will reopen for flights to around 22 destinations in low risk countries.

The decision was made after the officials expressed concern regarding the influx of international passengers, which could lead to an increase in Covid-19 cases.

Jordan has recorded very few cases of Covid-19 in the past few weeks from passengers arriving from other countries. The country has around 1,200 confirmed cases, with 11 deaths.

There has been an increase in Covid-19 cases in the neighbouring Gulf countries, including Iraq, Syria and Lebanon, which are major travel destinations from Jordan.

A Government of Jordan spokesman Amjad Adailah told state media that Queen Alia Airport will continue to serve repatriation flights for its citizens and residents.

The shutdown of Queen Alia Airport has increased the economic damage caused by the Covid-19 pandemic. Tourism is said to be a major source of international currency for Jordan.

In a separate development, India has banned international flights until 31 August due to the increasing Covid-19 cases in the country. The country continues to operate repatriation flights under its Vande Bharat Mission.

India has reported over two million Covid-19 cases with more than 39,000 deaths so far. Earlier this week, Kuwait Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) reportedly listed 31 countries as ‘high risk’ and banned commercial flights to those nations until further notice.