The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has given its support to the construction of a new international airport at the Mexican capital, Mexico City.

The new airport is expected to replace the Benito Juárez International Airport, also located in Mexico City.

“The current airport is bursting at the seams. It serves 47 million passengers, almost 50% over its design capacity of 32 million.”

IATA Americas regional vice-president Peter Cerda said: “The current airport is bursting at the seams. It serves 47 million passengers, almost 50% over its design capacity of 32 million.

“A new airport is vital to enable Mexico City to benefit more fully from its ideal geographic position linking North America and Latin America.”

In a new study, IATA revealed that aviation is estimated to support one million jobs and contribute 2.9% of GDP in Mexico.

However, in the absence of proper infrastructure at its capital city, the country has not been able to capture a larger share of the benefits of both regional and global aviation connectivity.

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By GlobalData

According to the study, for a country of its size, Mexico underperforms in terms of its integration with the global air transport network and is lagging behind much smaller neighbouring countries such as Panama, Dominican Republic, Colombia, Peru, and Chile.

The study also noted that if Mexico does not build the new airport, the country could lose 20 million passengers annually by 2035.

This represents a negative impact of up to $20bn in future GDP and up to 200,000 fewer jobs in the country supported by aviation in 2035.