Airport Industry Review: Issue 32

15 June 2018 (Last Updated June 15th, 2018 09:16)

In this issue: Airlines resume routes to Taiwan, how artificial intelligence could help baggage handling operations, problems with India’s aviation industry, Munich Airport’s LabCampus project, and more.

Airport Industry Review: Issue 32

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Since the 1990s, friction between Taiwan and China has placed a damper on international airline routes to the country. However, increased tourism and trade opportunities are now causing a sea change, with foreign airlines set to resume services to Taiwan’s Taipei Taoyuan airport. We delve deeper into the issue.

We also find out whether artificial intelligence could signal the end of lost baggage, examine whether India’s aviation industry can respond fast enough to meet rising demand, and profile Munich Airport’s LabCampus, an interdisciplinary idea and innovation centre on the airport grounds.

Finally, we look at how the confined spaces of airports can act as testbeds for autonomous vehicles, talk to Unisys Corporation about its new solution that uses IoT technologies to allow pet owners to monitor their pets while in transit, and look back at some of the major milestones in Gatwick Airport’s history as it celebrates 60 years.

In this issue

Taipei Taoyuan: a growing gateway to Asia
Political friction between Taiwan and China has long placed a damper on airline routes into the country. But with increased tourism encouraging airlines to resume services to Taipei Taoyuan, Eva Grey considers the airport’s future as an aviation hub.
Read the article here.

Artificial intelligence: the end of lost baggage?
With the number of air travellers set to double over the next 20 years, intelligent baggage tracking will be more essential than ever. Can artificial intelligence be harnessed to help manage the problem? Frances Marcellin investigates.
Read the article here.

India’s airports feel the heat as passenger numbers soar
Indian airports are straining to meet demand, as the country’s aviation market experiences unprecedented growth. Will big infrastructure projects in the pipeline be enough to stave off a capacity crisis? Eva Grey finds out.
Read the article here.

Inside Munich Airport’s LabCampus project
Munich Airport is about to embark on a unique project: under the name of LabCampus, the airport plans to develop an innovation centre. Eva Grey finds out more from LabCampus managing director Dr Marc Wagener.
Read the article here.

How airports can act as testbeds for autonomous vehicles
An Uber-like shuttle service at Gatwick and automated snowploughs in Norway are just two examples proving that airports are leading the way in applications of driverless vehicles. Frances Marcellin investigates.
Read the article here.

Digital tech aims to de-stress the pet transport experience
Unisys has unveiled Digi-Pet, a new solution that allows pet owners to monitor their pets while in transit. With the announcement following a spate of pet safety incidents on US airlines, Chris Lo finds out how the app could help.
Read the article here.

In pictures: Gatwick Airport celebrates 60 years
Gatwick Airport will celebrate the 60th anniversary of its official opening on 9 June. Adele Berti takes a closer look at some of the London airport’s biggest milestones.
Read the article here.

Next issue

A wave of ultra-long haul routes between distant airports have entered the market this year, offering travellers non-stop flights in aircraft configured especially for flying times of over 17 hours, including a new route from Houston, US to Sydney, Australia. Given that ultra-long haul routes were phased out in the past due to lack of passenger demand and unsustainable fuel costs, we find out what’s changed.

We also round up the airports that are pushing the boundaries of luxury entertainment into the virtual realm, learn more about Heathrow Airport’s sustainability agenda following warnings that a new runway could turn the airport into the UK’s largest source of carbon emissions, and ask whether airports should be doing more to help stranded migrants.

Finally, we find out whether Detroit Airport has a future after the city turned down a $4m offer from private investors to build a modern terminal and hangars at the site, and explore the world’s busiest airports – which handled 1.5 billion passengers last year – in a special map feature.