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The UK Government is proposing to impose civil penalties of up to £50,000 on airports and airlines that misdirect passengers, helping to strengthen border control. However, the Airport Operators Association argues the number of misdirected passengers is low and the penalties would be disproportionate. We check in on this border security debate.

We also take a closer look at Heathrow Airport’s new environmental tax, find out more about a project using blockchain to store flight information and use smart contracts to judge conflicting data in the aviation industry, and tour the cream of the crop in airport lounges.

Finally, we consider the impact of a new regulation to end 24-hour alcohol consumption in the UK’s airports, find out more about the role of airports in humanitarian logistics, and explore how technologies are creating a fully connected experience for air passengers.

In this issue

Lost in transit: are civil penalties for misdirecting passengers fair?
The UK Government plans to impose civil penalties on airports and airlines that misdirect passengers. However, the Airport Operators Association argues that such cases are rare and the penalties would be disproportionate. Julian Turner wades in to the border control debate.
Read the article here.

What’s behind Heathrow’s new environment charges?
Heathrow Airport has increased its environmental charges by 7%, incentivising airlines to use their newest aircraft to minimise the impact on local communities under the flight path. With Parliament set to vote on a third runway later this year, the timing of the new levy is no coincidence, as Ross Davies reports.
Read the article here.

Blockchain: the future of flight data management?
IT technology firm SITA has built a private-permissioned blockchain system called FlightChain, which stores flight information and uses smart contracts to judge potentially conflicting information. Joe Baker learns more about the project from lead engineer Kevin O’Sullivan.
Read the article here.

In pictures: the world’s best airport lounges
Last year, thousands of travellers cast their votes for the annual Lounge of the Year Awards, to name the best airport lounges in the world. From Jamaica’s culturally rich ambience to Estonia’s subdued comfort, Eva Grey takes a closer look at some of the winners.
Read the article here.

Boozy airports: UK cracks down on drunken passengers
The UK Government could be set to close the loophole that allows airport pubs and bars to operate outside the country’s licensing laws. The move has been welcomed by airlines, but will this new measure be effective? Joe Baker reports.
Read the article here.

When disaster strikes: role of aviation in humanitarian logistics
After a devastating past year, humanitarian tragedies show no signs of slowing, which is why relief logisticians need to ensure support is on hand at a moment’s notice. Eva Grey finds out why the aviation sector is the first point of call for fast, reliable aid delivery.
Read the article here.

Transport 4.0: how connected transport will benefit airport terminals
Current and future technologies are moving us towards a multimodal transportation system that creates a fully connected experience for air passengers. Roch Muraine, global sales director of transport at Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise, looks at how these trends are set to disrupt the way we travel forever.
Read the article here.

Next issue

Earlier this year, Sydney and Heathrow independently reported the huge financial benefits to be reaped from offering direct routes into China. As airports worldwide aim to attract increased Chinese tourism, we investigate exactly how and why the country is such a profitable destination for airports at the moment.

We also take a look at the new technologies promising to relieve gate anxiety, locate the world’s most environmentally friendly airports and find out what elements of their design help them to offset carbon emissions, and consider how Auckland Airport’s new traffic measurement project is helping to improve passenger flow.

Finally, we learn more about the See Say app, which empowers passengers to quickly and safely alert authorities if they witness an emergency or terror incident, and talk to brand consultancy Start Design about how airports can develop a unique brand that enhances the passenger experience.