Warplanes strike Tripoli’s Mitiga airport

15 April 2015 (Last Updated April 15th, 2015 18:30)

Tripoli's Mitiga airport has been attacked by warplanes in another bout of violence in the war-torn Libya.

Tripoli's Mitiga airport has been attacked by warplanes in another bout of violence in the war-torn Libya.

Reuters quoted officials as saying that forces loyal to the internationally recognised government of Prime Minister Abdullah al-Thinni carried out the airstrikes at Libya's capital which is now under the control of its rival government.

According to the Associated Press, the attack has been condemned by the US special envoy to Libya Bernardino Leon who said that the attack took place when one of the delegations to ongoing peace talks was attempting to leave.

"We hope that there will be an investigation into who is behind this attack and we hope that an explanation will be given to the international community."

Leon said that the airstrike was an attempt to prevent a Tripoli delegation from travelling to Morocco for the new round of peace talks.

Leon said in a UN statement: "We have seen negative messages (aimed) towards this dialogue but we have never seen air strikes at the moment when one of the delegations is taking off on its way to the talks.

"We hope that there will be an investigation into who is behind this attack and we hope that an explanation will be given to the international community."

Reuters quoted Mohamed El Hejazi, spokesman for army forces loyal to the government of Prime Minister Abdullah al-Thinni as saying that warplanes had attacked Tripoli's Mitiga airport and other targets in western Libya.

While Mitiga airport's spokesman Abdulsalam Buamoud said that the planes had missed the airport, a security source said a missile battery which was 10 km from the airport on the outskirts of Tripoli had been hit.

For the past one month, representatives from Libya's two governments have been meeting in Morocco for peace talks to end the fighting that has been continuing for the past four years following the ousting of Muammar Gaddafi.