Swiss air traffic management boosted by Skyguide

4 November 2013 (Last Updated November 4th, 2013 18:30)

Skyguide, a provider of air navigation services, is set to adopt electronic coordination at its two area control centres in the next few weeks in order to further modernise its Swiss air traffic management services.

Skyguide, a provider of air navigation services, is set to adopt electronic coordination at its two area control centres in the next few weeks in order to further modernise its Swiss air traffic management services.

The new procedure will be introduced at the Area Control Centre (ACC) of Geneva on the night of 4-5 November and at the Zurich ACC on the night of 9-10 December.

Skyguide noted that the new electronic coordination is one of the most important developments in Swiss air traffic management in the last 30 years.

The new electronic coordination is part of Skyguide's 'stripless' project to gradually replace the paper strips used to record and pass on flight and aircraft information with electronic solutions.

The new procedure, which is the second release of the stripless system, allows controllers to hand over a flight from one sector to another at the click of a mouse without the need for telephonic coordination.

This capability will significantly lower the workload and limit a source of potential errors, further enhancing the efficiency and the safety level of Skyguide's air traffic management activities.

The release will also further strengthen the electronic monitoring of flight levels as it includes a new 'Cleared Level Adherence Monitoring based on Enhanced Mode S' or EHS-CLAM function. This alerts the controller in case of a divergence between the selected altitude in the cockpit and the cleared flight level in the control centre.

While the EHS-CLAM safety function has been in operation since early 2012, the new release integrates Mode S data, which provides more extensive information on the flights concerned, and an automatic alert.

This safety feature will ensure that working errors of the cockpit crew or air traffic control are identified and corrected, potential infringements of the separation minima avoided earlier, and safety level further increased.

This function will allow Swiss air navigation services to take on a pioneering role and position themselves at the forefront of European air traffic, according to Skyguide.