SITA and NEC collaborate on automated gate system at EU airports

29 October 2012 (Last Updated October 29th, 2012 18:30)

SITA and NEC Europe (NEC) have collaborated to deploy an automated border control (ABC) gate solution at immigration control points of all airports in the European Union (EU).

SITA and NEC Europe (NEC) have collaborated to deploy an automated border control (ABC) gate solution at immigration control points of all airports in the European Union (EU).

The move follows recommendations by the EU member states to switch to self-service border control using ABC gates that incorporate biometrics technology.

SITA Government Solutions vice president Dan Ebbinghaus said that automated border control (ABC) gates are the potential solution to the combined goals of enhancing the passenger journey and increasing border security.

"Working with NEC, our ABC gates combine SITA's air transport industry experience and market knowledge with the fastest and most accurate face recognition software in the market," Ebbinghaus added.

Integrating face recognition, and optionally fingerprint verification, the new SITA/NEC's ABC solution is expected to assist in accelerating passenger flow at border control checkpoints and enhance security and resource management.

SITA claims that the new solution will allow passenger processing in about 10 seconds.

"SITA claims that the new solution will allow passenger processing in about 10 seconds."

The system's NeoFace face recognition algorithm is claimed to offer speed, accuracy and performance, despite database size and quality of image.

NEC vice president of IT Solutions Chris de Silva said that the incorporation of the firm's software into the new ABC gate will significantly enhance the efficiency of processing people through control checkpoints.

"SITA has a wealth of experience as an IT integrator in the air transport industry and we are well-placed with our combined expertise to deliver a market-leading ABC solution across Europe," de Silva said.

The ABC gate solution, which works with e-passports, requires manual interference by an immigration officer only during an unsuccessful match between passenger and passport, further setting free border security staff for other activities.