Scottish airports seek a reduction in Air Passenger Duty

28 January 2016 (Last Updated January 28th, 2016 18:30)

Scottish airports have sent a joint letter to First Minister Nicola Sturgeon seeking a reduction in the Air Passenger Duty (APD) at the airports by 50% from April 2018.

Scottish airports have sent a joint letter to First Minister Nicola Sturgeon seeking a reduction in the Air Passenger Duty (APD) at the airports by 50% from April 2018.

According to an independent research undertaken by the Edinburgh Airport, this reduction will create additional 4,000 jobs and add an extra £1bn to Scotland's economy.

Edinburgh Airport chief executive Gordon Dewar was quoted by Airport World as saying: "We welcome the Scottish Government's recognition that Air Passenger Duty is an iniquitous tax hitting all of our passengers - that is why we are urging Nicola Sturgeon and the SNP to make a commitment to halve APD in 2018.

"This is something which has also been recognised by our business and tourism partners."

"It needs priority because any piecemeal approach would significantly undermine the benefits that an early 50% cut would bring."

According to managing director of Glasgow Airport Amanda McMillan, the major airports of Scotland have always "had a very clear position on the importance of abolishing APD".

McMillan was quoted by Airport World as saying: "The longer this regressive tax is in place, the longer it will damage Scotland's economy, our tourism potential and our ability to prosper as a nation.

"This is something which has also been recognised by our business and tourism partners."

The case for the reduction in APD to the Smith Commission was forwarded by Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh airports back in 2014.

Scottish Chambers of Commerce chief executive Liz Cameron was quoted by The National as saying: "APD is a tax on Scotland's connectivity and a tax on international trade.

"Devolution of APD therefore gives Scotland the opportunity to boost our competitiveness by decisively reducing the impact of this tax by 50%.

"Doing so would make Scotland an even more attractive to do business and the sooner this tax is cut, the better."