Saab remote tower system completes site acceptance test for Sweden’s LFV

26 February 2013 (Last Updated February 26th, 2013 18:30)

Saab's remote tower (r-TWR) system, currently under deployment with Swedish air navigation service provider LFV, has finished site acceptance testing (SAT).

Remote Tower

Saab's remote tower (r-TWR) system, currently under deployment with Swedish air navigation service provider LFV, has finished site acceptance testing (SAT).

Completion of SAT clears the way for the Swedish Transport Authority to begin the certification process for LFV's Remote Tower Services with full operational certification expected later in 2013.

The system is being deployed, as part of a contract signed in December 2010, at Sweden's Sundsvall and Örnsköldsvik Airports to allow control of air traffic at both airports from a single air traffic control centre through high-resolution video.

LFV Tower and Approach Control marketing manager Pia Johansson said: "Remote Tower Services allows us to safely deliver services while reducing costs for our customers."

Designed to offer a safe and efficient operation of airports, the r-TWR uses digital cameras and other sensors to deliver the situational awareness required to perform remote operations.

The received video and other sensor data will be fed to a RTC and the video will be streamed live to a controller for display on several LCD screens.

Controllers at the RTC can operate all sensors in addition to integrated flight data, airfield equipment, electronic flight strips and other tools associated with air traffic control.

The system features object tracking and alerting, infra-red vision and image enhancement, which improves the controller's situational awareness in low-visibility conditions.

"The r-TWR uses digital cameras and other sensors to deliver the situational awareness required to perform remote operations."

Saab Sensis senior vice president Ken Kaminski said that remote towers offer safe, cost-effective delivery of air traffic services to new locations and can be used as a replacement for outdated facilities.

"It also opens the opportunity to merge multiple tower operations into one centre for more efficient services," Kaminski said.

The system also reduces low-visibility procedures, which are responsible for causing delays, by enhancing the reliability of air movement.

Information captured by cameras would allow reproducing traffic situations that enable investigating incidents, while enhancing the safety benefits of the r-TWR.

The r-TWR system, which is also being tested in Australia and Norway, trims down airport control tower construction and maintenance costs, while allowing more efficient staffing of air-traffic services.


Image: Saab r-TWR uses digital cameras and other sensors to deliver the situational awareness required to perform remote ATC operations. Photo: courtesy of LFV.