Raytheon unveils mobile air traffic control system

7 March 2012 (Last Updated March 7th, 2012 04:35)

Raytheon has unveiled a new mobile air traffic control (MATC) system at the ATC Global Exhibition and Conference held in Amsterdam, Netherlands which offers critical air traffic services when the existing infrastructure is damaged or unavailable.

Raytheon has unveiled a new mobile air traffic control (MATC) system at the ATC Global Exhibition and Conference held in Amsterdam, Netherlands which offers critical air traffic services when the existing infrastructure is damaged or unavailable.

The modular system is designed to enable humanitarian aid deliveries in emergencies or to meet temporary airfield security requirements.

Raytheon's new ATC consists of primary and secondary ATC radars integrated with quickly deployable radar antenna and secure, networked data communications allowing the deployment of the system within hours.

Raytheon Network Centric Systems business International Air Traffic Management director, Stephen DuMont, said: "It is vital to the humanitarian effort to have effective ATC in place to enable urgent deliveries by air, and that is why we developed a rapidly deployable MATC system."

The low-risk, interoperable solution was designed through the integration of subsystems, comprising the Digital Airport Surveillance Radar (DASR)/ASR-11, the Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System (STARS) and the company's AutoTrac III, an integrated surveillance and flight data processing system.

Compliant to international regulation, the interoperable system will support both civil and military ATC operations and communicate with other air traffic services and battle command systems.

MATC comprises three shelters which can be used to transport and house the radar, communications and operations equipment and can be moved anywhere in the world via land, sea or air.

 

Image: Raytheon's new MATC is designed to enable humanitarian aid deliveries in emergencies, for security purposes, or to meet temporary airfield requirements. Photo: Coolcaesar.