Passenger traffic at Europe’s airports increase by 4.8%

5 March 2015 (Last Updated March 5th, 2015 18:30)

Airports Council International Europe (ACI Europe) has released its traffic report for January 2015, which says that passenger traffic at Europe’s airports increased by an average of 4.8% in comparison to 2014.

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Airports Council International Europe (ACI Europe) has released its traffic report for January 2015, which says that passenger traffic at Europe's airports increased by an average of 4.8% in comparison to 2014.

The report also says that for the first time since 2009, passenger traffic at EU airports recorded greater growth than their non-EU counterparts.

While non-EU airports grew by 3.8%, the EU airports saw 5.1% increase in passenger traffic.

However, freight traffic at non-EU airports fell by 5.3% which brought down the overall percentage by 0.5%. Freight traffic at EU airports saw a dip of 0.1%.

"In line with the past year, passenger traffic at EU airports continues to grow dynamically - well above underlying macroeconomic conditions."

ACI Europe director general Olivier Jankovec said: "In line with the past year, passenger traffic at EU airports continues to grow dynamically - well above underlying macroeconomic conditions. However, the picture remains very contrasted between national markets - from double digit growth in Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Romania, Hungary and Belgium down to negative figures in Austria, Slovenia and Finland.

"Outside the EU, the economic recession in Russia and the military conflict in Ukraine are taking an increasing toll on traffic performance, especially on freight - with the impact felt well beyond airports located in these countries."

Airports belonging to Group 1 (more than 25 million passengers per year), Group 2 (between ten and 25 million passengers), Group 3 nine between five and ten million passengers) and Group 4 (less than five million passengers per year) saw an average adjustment of 3.4%, 6.5%, 5.6% and 5.1%, respectively.

"Looking at the months ahead, we are certainly not short of downside risks for air traffic - from failure to reach agreement over Greek debt to the spiral of deflation and geopolitical tensions further escalating. But these past weeks have also yielded some new positives coming from lower oil prices, increased consumer confidence and slightly improving labour markets in the Eurozone. All this means that as long as those downside risks remain in check, traffic growth should hold - at least on the passenger side."


Image: EU airports grew more than non-EU airports in January 2015. Photo: courtesy of khunaspix/freedigitalphotos.net.