Jeppesen collaborates with Nav Canada to design RNAV RNP-based flight procedures

9 May 2013 (Last Updated May 9th, 2013 18:30)

Boeing subsidiary Jeppesen has collaborated with Canadian civil air navigation service provider Nav Canada to design and deliver area navigation with required navigation performance (RNAV RNP) instrument flight procedures, based on performance-based navigation (PBN).

 Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International, Canada

Boeing subsidiary Jeppesen has collaborated with Canadian civil air navigation service provider Nav Canada to design and deliver area navigation with required navigation performance (RNAV RNP) instrument flight procedures, based on performance-based navigation (PBN).

The collaboration will support Nav Canada's plans to improve takeoff and landing efficiency through precise flight procedures that offer increased runway throughput, while reducing aircraft fuel burn and greenhouse gas emissions.

Jeppesen CEO, Boeing Digital Aviation vice president Mark Van Tine said: "Working together, we will deliver optimised design and airspace procedures that will allow for more optimised operations through reduced fuel consumption and less airline miles flown."

"The collaboration will support Nav Canada's plans to improve takeoff and landing efficiency through precise flight procedures that offer increased runway throughput."

PBN is the foundation of the US Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) NextGen modernisation programme, Europe's SESAR programme and other future air traffic management concepts, and implementation of PBN is expected to lessen the number of delays on the ground and in the air.

RNAV varies from traditional navigation, by which, aircraft navigate from beacon to beacon or are steered by air traffic control, by allowing aircraft to fly a course within a network of navigation beacons or waypoints as per GPS guidance.

RNAV and RNP specifications, through reduced onboard navigational performance monitoring and alerting, will allow more accurate lateral and horizontal aircraft routing, as well as enabling aircraft to move down from altitude with no level offs in between.

The procedures also aim to assist the air traffic system to manage and recover from weather and other problems that direct to system-wide interruptions.


Image: The implementation of RNAV and RNP based flight procedures would reduce aircraft fuel burn and greenhouse gas emissions in Canadian airspace.