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October 27, 2015

IATA seeks government cooperation for better passenger experience

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) is advocating better coordination between the industry and the governments for making security checks more acceptable for passengers.

By Prasanth Katam

IATA

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) is advocating better coordination between the industry and the governments for making security checks more acceptable for passengers.

IATA is launching the Smart Security Opportunity Assessment programme to enhance security at airports, while making the process convenient for travellers.

Amsterdam, London Heathrow, Melbourne and Doha’s Hamad international airports are piloting the Smart Security initiative that intends to make security checks more passenger friendly.

A joint project between IATA and Airports Council International (ACI), Smart Security aims to achieve its goal by focusing resources based on risk, using advanced security screening technologies and promoting innovations in process.

"A deepened working partnership of industry and governments has ample scope for further improvements."

IATA director general and CEO Tony Tyler said during the opening of the AVSEC World aviation security conference: "Our customers, the billions of people who fly with no ill intention, continue to tell us that security is the biggest pain point in their journey.

"A deepened working partnership of industry and governments has ample scope for further improvements."

Smart Security includes known-traveller programmes that allow certain identified low-risk passengers to undergo a streamlined process with shorter queues while the personnel concentrate on high-risk travellers.

The US ‘Pre-Check’ known-traveller programme covered nearly one in five passengers at the country’s airports.

IATA has highlighted the non-compliance of individual government requirements with global standards.

"Instead of a single coordinated European approach with information shared across the EU member states, airlines face up to 28 unique regimes. Each European state is deciding the scope of data to be collected and the method for transfer.

"I don’t question the authority of states to require such information. But this uncoordinated approach is leading to what looks like an expensive, onerous and likely wasteful effort," Tyler added.


Image: Smart Security initiative is being piloted at Amsterdam and Melbourne airports. Photo: courtesy of Tuomas_Lehtinen / Freedigitalphotos.net.

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