Frankfurt Airport to implement new system for satellite-based precision approaches

8 May 2013 (Last Updated May 8th, 2013 18:30)

The German air navigation service provider, DFS Deutsche Flugsicherung, and Frankfurt airport operator, Fraport, have announced a collaboration to implement a satellite and ground-based augmentation system (GBAS).

Frankfurt Airport, new system for satellite-based precision approaches

The German air navigation service provider, DFS Deutsche Flugsicherung, and Frankfurt airport operator, Fraport, have announced a collaboration to implement a satellite and ground-based augmentation system (GBAS).

The GBAS will allow segmented and/or curved approaches, helping in cutting down aircraft noise, even in areas beneath the final approach path.

The new landing system is expected to reduce the impact of flight operations on the surrounding areas, while boosting the capacity and cost-effectiveness of the airport.

Fraport executive board chairman Dr Stefan Schulte said that the move should help in continuing to reduce the impact of flight operations on the area surrounding the airport.

"We are implementing another item of the set of measures laid down by the Alliance for Noise Abatement," Schulte said.

Set to be the first of its kind to be used at an international airport in Europe by 2014, the system will increase the glide slope angle at all runways from the existing 3° to 3.2°.

GBAS offers digital guidance for precision approaches through the differential global positioning system (DGPS) procedure, while boosting accuracy and integrity of GPS by transmitting corrected data to the aircraft.

"The GBAS will allow segmented and/or curved approaches, helping in cutting down aircraft noise, even in areas beneath the final approach path."

The GBAS ground station assists the approaching aircraft to determine its exact position and enables a safe and precise final approach.

The station receives signals transmitted by the satellite and then compares them with its own position and generates a corrected signal to the landing aircraft together with approach path coordinates.

A single GBAS station is capable of supporting up to 49 arrivals that are destined for multiple runways.

Additionally, the system is expected to completely replace the instrument landing system (ILS) upon the deployment of appropriate on-board receivers onto all aircraft.

DFS CEO Klaus-Dieter Scheurle said: "With this technology, we are making an important contribution to increasing efficiency and reducing noise for approach procedures in the long term."

Currently, Airbus A380 and Boeing 747-8 are capable of implementing GBAS.


Image: Frankfurt Airport is first European airport to implement ground-based augmentation system (GBAS) for satellite-based precision approaches.