ACI: Dubai international airport received maximum international passengers in 2014

26 March 2015 (Last Updated March 26th, 2015 18:30)

A preliminary passenger traffic survey by ACI for 2014 has revealed that the airports in Atlanta, Beijing, London-Heathrow and Tokyo-Haneda are the four busiest airports in the world.

A preliminary passenger traffic survey by ACI for 2014 has revealed that the airports in Atlanta, Beijing, London-Heathrow and Tokyo-Haneda are the four busiest airports in the world.

While the report said that the Dubai airport ranked sixth in total passenger numbers, it ranked one when considering international passenger traffic.

Istanbul, that saw a 10.7% rise in traffic, moved from 18th to 13th rank and was said to be the fastest growing airport in the world's top 20 airports.

"With its astonishing capacity and growth, aviation's nucleus certainly has moved eastward."

In terms of air cargo, Hong Kong, Memphis, Shanghai and Incheon occupy the first four ranks, respectively.

After a drop in the aircraft movements of the Atlanta airport, Chicago-O'Hare has become the busiest airport in terms of aircraft movements.

ACI World's economics director Rafael Echevarne said: "The airport that continued to make its mark in 2014 was Dubai International. The airport has solidified its status as the world's major international connecting hub. Dubai is the fulcrum that connects long-haul international flights from east and west, north and south.

"That being said, it's sister airport, Dubai World Central, under the same Dubai Airports organization, is poised to surpass these feats by becoming the world's largest global gateway with capacity of more than 160 million passengers per year and a multi-modal logistics hub for 12 million tonnes of air cargo.

"Since the commencement of its operations, the airport has already moved up to the 29th busiest air cargo airport in the world handling almost 760,000 metric tonnes of cargo in 2014. With its astonishing capacity and growth, aviation's nucleus certainly has moved eastward."