Corpus Christi Airport in Texas to redesign runway

6 August 2012 (Last Updated August 6th, 2012 18:30)

Corpus Christi International Airport (CCIA) in Texas, US, is planning to redesign its runway to reduce traffic and eliminate safety concerns.

Corpus Christi International Airport (CCIA) in Texas, US, is planning to redesign its runway to reduce traffic and eliminate safety concerns.

The initial phase of the $31m runway revamp programme at the airport is expected to commence in October 2012.

Of the total cost, the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has provided close to $16.3m, while the airport will invest only 10% of the project costs or about $1.8m.

The V-shaped runways create safety concerns as one of the taxiways connects both runways, which can confuse pilots during crossover.

Corpus Christi International Airport director of aviation Fred Segundo said: "Redesigning the runway will help ensure safety for passengers and pilots who are flying in and out of CCIA."

The federal grant will be used for the initial phase of the project, which includes enhancements to the runway situated on the east side of the airport.

"Corpus Christi International Airport is owned by the city of Corpus Christi and currently handles close to 300 aircraft every day."

The airport's second phase of the project, which is expected to begin the following year, includes the extension of the main runway by 1,600ft to 9,100ft, allowing larger cargo aircraft to land.

The redesign also features the removal of the taxiway that connects the ends of both runways, as well as adding a new taxiway further down.

According to the airport, the project is expected to be completed in two years, during which both runways will be closed.

Following the completion of the project, the airport's runway and taxi system will comply with the latest FAA standards for safe and efficient use for commercial, military and general aviation traffic.

Corpus Christi International Airport is owned by the city of Corpus Christi and currently handles close to 300 aircraft every day.