Canadian transport ministry proposes new aerodrome rules under aviation regulations

9 July 2015 (Last Updated July 9th, 2015 18:30)

Canada is likely to soon introduce changes to its aviation regulations to enhance efficiency and transparency in the construction and operation of aerodromes across the country.

Canada is likely to soon introduce changes to its aviation regulations to enhance efficiency and transparency in the construction and operation of aerodromes across the country.

The Canadian Minister of Transport Lisa Raitt has proposed amendments to Canadian Aviation Regulations, which will be published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, today.

Under the new proposals, aerodrome developers will require to consult the stakeholders before the development of a new aerodrome or while upgrading an existing one.

"I have spoken with Canadians and they want their concerns heard before aerodromes are built in their neighbourhoods."

The change is aimed at providing stakeholders, including local citizens, municipalities, local aerodrome operators, air navigation service providers and the minister of transport, with a platform to make their opinions heard.

Raitt said: "I have spoken with Canadians and they want their concerns heard before aerodromes are built in their neighbourhoods.

"These proposed changes will give Canadians the voice they deserve, promote Canada's aviation sector, and keep people and goods moving in communities across the country."

The country has 547 certified and around 2,000 registered aerodromes.

The ministry will give citizens around 60 days to give their feedback on the proposed changes following which the final regulations will be published in Canada Gazette, Part II, in 2016.

The changes will be applicable for existing or proposed aerodromes that are not used for military or agricultural purposes.

Aerodromes that handle less than 90 take-offs and landings annually and the ones that are used as temporary installations for providing emergency services including forest fire suppression, law enforcement activities, search and rescue operations and responding to a medical necessity will not be included in the new regulations.