CAAS to provide $160m for air traffic management research

3 September 2012 (Last Updated September 3rd, 2012 18:30)

The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) has set up a S$200m ($160m) fund to support research institutes and conduct research and development (R&D) activities in air traffic management (ATM) over the next ten years.

The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) has set up a S$200m ($160m) fund to support research institutes and conduct research and development (R&D) activities in air traffic management (ATM) over the next ten years.

The fund will be managed by CAAS in a bid to help develop Singapore into a centre of excellence for ATM.

As part of the initiative, research institutes, think-tanks and industry players will work together to develop new concepts and technologies, which includes adapting technologies that have already been developed for other regions.

Academics, international ATM operators and aviation stakeholders are expected to join the research initiative.

CAAS believes that ATM is critical to the growth of air traffic, and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) estimates that air traffic in the region is set to rise three times by 2030.

The development of ATM technologies and solutions will help address capacity growth and maintain high safety and service standards in Singapore and the Asia Pacific region, CAAS said.

Singapore Transport Minister Lui Tuck Yew said to meet demand and manage the complexities associated with increased air traffic, the country needs to enhance its aviation system's capacity and put the right air traffic management systems in place.

"CAAS aims therefore to develop Singapore as a centre of excellence for ATM, where we are the nexus of a wide range of ATM research and development activities and a marketplace for ATM solutions, focused on meeting the unique requirements of Singapore and the Asia Pacific region," Yew said.

The Minister also unveiled a new air traffic control (ATC) simulator at the Singapore Aviation Academy to train air traffic controllers.

The simulator is part of CAAS's S$300m ($240m) next-generation Long Range Radar and Display System III (LORADS III), which is due to be launched in the second half of 2013.