Aviation Safety Technologies’ SafeLand system to avoid runway overruns

24 September 2012 (Last Updated September 24th, 2012 18:30)

Aviation Safety Technologies has developed, SafeLand, a new technology that offers pilots accurate information about conditions on the tarmac, especially during landings in bad weather.

Aviation Safety Technologies has developed, SafeLand, a new technology that offers pilots accurate information about conditions on the tarmac, especially during landings in bad weather.

The braking action reporting system will provide real-time situational awareness to pilots with current data on runway conditions.

Real-time data provided by SafeLand will help in monitoring aircraft systems that include speed brakes, spoilers, flaps and hydraulic and mechanical braking systems.

The system will also help measure physical parameters, such as speed, deceleration, temperature, pressure and wind, to help pilots get reports of runway surface characteristics, braking friction, cornering friction and tire and brake wear.

SafeLand technology is currently being tested by four carriers including American Airlines and Delta Air Lines.

Federal Aviation Administration top runway-safety official Patrick Doyle told Wall Street Journal: "It's a wonderful technology, and we are pushing this very hard."

The downloaded information from planes' computers, following landing at airports, is collected in a central repository then bonded and controlled with an aim of delivering digital updates on runway conditions.

Aviation Safety Technologies senior managing director Mike Dahl said: "It's vastly improved intelligence about what's really happening on the ground."

Due to the initial phase of testing the technology showed safety benefits, FAA is now planning a broader study on whether the technology will improve airlines on-time performance at busy airports.