Auckland Airport to deploy CEM AC2000 technology to improve security

19 March 2013 (Last Updated March 19th, 2013 18:30)

Auckland Airport in New Zealand has awarded a contract to CEM Systems for the deployment of its AC2000 security management system.

Auckland Airport

Auckland Airport in New Zealand has awarded a contract to CEM Systems for the deployment of its AC2000 security management system.

ADT New Zealand has been selected as an integrator and will be responsible for the installation of AC2000 system at the airport's domestic and international terminals.

ADT Security New Zealand Commercial national manager David Tombs said that the company will complete the installation of the CEM AC2000 system with minimum disruption to airport operations.

"The CEM portable readers will enable us to manage the system switchover without any loss of access integrity," Tombs said.

"We will also be using existing cabling at the airport to complete the installation, keeping the project cost effective and delivered on time."

CEM's security solution incorporates AC2000 software modules, including the company's AC2000 Visual Imaging and PassProduction System (VIPPS) that enables security personnel to create passes and access rights for staff and visitors.

"The company will complete the installation of the CEM AC2000 system with minimum disruption to airport operations."

Additionally, the airport will deploy AC2000 WEB Visitors, which will allow the system users to request and manage temporary cardholders through a standard web browser.

The airport will also be equipped with AC2000 Time and Attendance module (T&A) to facilitate reading employees' in and out times, while AC2000 Failover will be used to create a system with a high level of redundancy.

AC2000 Failover creates and maintains a copy of the main AC2000 server and instantly takes over the operations of main server in the event of its malfunctioning, until the main server begins its operations efficiently.

The use of CEM S3030 card readers will assist the on-site airport security staff to authenticate cards at remote sites or areas with no mains power supply and they can also be deployed as mobile devices for random verifications during emergency evacuations.


Image: Australasia's second busiest international airport, Auckland serves around 14 million passengers per year.