April passenger traffic up at Muscat and Salalah airports

21 May 2012 (Last Updated May 21st, 2012 04:35)

Muscat International Airport and Salalah Airport in Oman reported a rise in passenger traffic in April 2012.

Muscat airport

Muscat International Airport and Salalah Airport in Oman reported a rise in passenger traffic in April 2012.

Muscat airport has reported 22% rise of arrivals and departures to 2,482,449 passengers during April 2012, when compared to the corresponding month in 2011.

Arrival traffic at the airport rose 23% to 1,271,471 passengers during the period, in comparison to 1,032,066, while departure numbers increased 20% to 1,172,540, in contrast to 978,745 passengers, reported during the same period in 2011.

The rise was credited to the launch of new airlines, including Indigo, Ethiopian Airlines and United Airways of Bangladesh, in addition to rise in flights operated by the current airlines, including Oman air, FlyDubai, Qatar Airways, Sri Lankan Airlines, Turkish Airlines and Pakistan International Airlines.

Muscat International's air cargo traffic climbed to 27%, with the total shipment at 39,025t from January until April, when compared to shipments of 30,744t that were recorded during the same period in 2011.

Salalah Airport's arriving and departing passengers rose 25% to 195,183 passengers during the period, when compared to 155,628 registered in 2011.

According to ONA, air cargo movement at Salalah airport recorded a 9% increase in freight traffic to 468t, up from 429t in 2011.

Traffic at Muscat International airport during the first three months of 2012 rose 21% to 1,840,536 passengers, while Salalah reported a 26% increase to 149,125.

Muscat and Salalah airports have reported 29% and 22% climbs in total freight and mail movements to 29,893t and 388t, respectively, during the first three months of 2012, when compared to 2011.


Image: The rise in traffic at Muscat airport was attributed to launch of new airlines reporting to Muscat and increase in flight operations by its existing carriers. Photo: courtesy of Reubentg.