South Korea Plans to Install Full Body Scanners Ahead of G20

1 February 2010 (Last Updated February 1st, 2010 18:30)

The South Korean Government plans to install full body scanners at major international airports across the nation ahead of the G20 summit. South Korea will host the G20 economic summit in November 2010, but the move has already triggered controversy regarding privacy. Three

The South Korean Government plans to install full body scanners at major international airports across the nation ahead of the G20 summit.

South Korea will host the G20 economic summit in November 2010, but the move has already triggered controversy regarding privacy.

Three or four scanners are expected to be installed at Incheon International Airport in the first half of the year, while other airports including Gimpo International Airport are also expected to receive the scanners.

Full body scanners are being installed at airports across the world following the failed attempt to bomb a US-bound plane by Nigerian passenger Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab on Christmas day last year.

The US, the UK, the Netherlands and Japan have either introduced, or are testing, the system, while Canada, France and Thailand are also planning to install the equipment.

A non-departmental government body in the UK, the Equality and Human Rights Commission, said that the scanners breach the Human Rights Act, which protects an individual's right to privacy.

The South Korean Government said it has prepared guidelines in a bid to protect passenger privacy at airports.

Full body scanning will only be undergone by passengers identified as suspicious during the first stage security check or those that feature on a security list.

Pregnant women, infants and disabled passengers will not be subjected to the full body scan.