Airports Increase Security Following Terrorist Bomb Scare

3 January 2010 (Last Updated January 3rd, 2010 18:30)

Airports in the UK, Australia, Pakistan and India are seeking ways to improve security, including the introduction of full-body scanners, following the failed Christmas Day terrorist attack on a US-bound flight from Amsterdam. The moves follow the admission by the Obama administration t

Airports in the UK, Australia, Pakistan and India are seeking ways to improve security, including the introduction of full-body scanners, following the failed Christmas Day terrorist attack on a US-bound flight from Amsterdam.

The moves follow the admission by the Obama administration that it had missed clear signals that a Nigerian passenger who attempted to blow up the US Northwest Airlines flight could be a terrorist.

23-year-old Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, who is now being detained in the US, was a resident of the UK. He planted explosive material inside his underwear that remained undetected as he passed through airport security at Amsterdam.

The UK, among other nations such as Australia, says it will now increase security for all passengers, and introduce the controversial scan as one of its security measures.

In the UK, hand luggage will also be screened for traces of explosives and passenger profiling, as used in places such as Israel, will also be considered.

London Heathrow Airport will be one of the first to get the new full-body scanners, according to airport operator BAA.

Trials for the scanner have already taken place at Heathrow, as well as at fellow UK airport Manchester.

The US has also increased its security, especially for in-bound flights, especially those from terrorist-prone nations such as Cuba, Iran, Sudan, Syria, Afghanistan, Algeria, Iraq, Yemen and Lebanon among others.

Full-body patdowns and the physical inspection of property will be carried out in the US and at departure nations, according to US customs.

The alleged bomber had passed through a magnetometer that did not detect any explosives, according to US officials.